krazykitkat: (the end (Angel))
Harve Presnell died 30th June, aged 75, from pancreatic cancer.

Andrea Parker mentioned on one of the dvd commentaries that he'd leave her voice mails saying, "Hello Angel, it's Daddy." He sounded like a lovely man.

If he'd been born 10-20 years earlier, he would probably have been one of the great movie musical stars. I'm glad he got such great character roles in his later years.

I will go and listen to "They call the wind Maria" in honour of him.
krazykitkat: (the end (Angel))
Harve Presnell died 30th June, aged 75, from pancreatic cancer.

Andrea Parker mentioned on one of the dvd commentaries that he'd leave her voice mails saying, "Hello Angel, it's Daddy." He sounded like a lovely man.

If he'd been born 10-20 years earlier, he would probably have been one of the great movie musical stars. I'm glad he got such great character roles in his later years.

I will go and listen to "They call the wind Maria" in honour of him.
krazykitkat: (the end (Angel))
Such a great loss.

From SMH:

CHRISTOPHER O'BRIEN, the world-renowned cancer specialist who died from a brain tumour last night, acquired many honours during his career, including being made an officer in the Order of Australia, to be announced in the Queen's Birthday honours list on Monday.

But, in his final interview two days ago, Professor O'Brien said what mattered most to him was his standing in the eyes of his three adult children: "I just want my children to really know they knew their father well and they loved and admired him as a person. That's my only wish really."

Professor O'Brien, who was 57, led research into head and neck cancer in Australia and operated on hundreds of patients, including the Test cricketer Norman O'Neill and the Dragon lead singer Marc Hunter.

Diagnosed with a brain tumour in November 2006, he refused to bow to his grim prognosis. He had five major operations before succumbing to the disease in Royal Prince Alfred Hospital.

The Herald visited the doctor at his Hunters Hill home on Wednesday to discuss his AO, awarded for his achievement in establishing the $150 million Lifehouse Centre at the hospital, the first purpose-built integrated cancer centre in Australia.

The man who played rugby for Sydney University and was well-known to television audiences as a vigorous and charismatic surgeon on the reality show RPA, sat hunched in an armchair, surrounded by books, his dog asleep at his feet.

Six weeks ago he had become paralysed on his left side, yet he retained the tenacity of mind that powered his stellar career.

He seemed keen to write his own legacy. Before the first question, he stated there were three things he wanted to get across: "The first is that I'm honoured to be recognised. Second is that, in my 30 years as a doctor and more than 20 years working as a specialist cancer surgeon, I really haven't achieved anything that was worthwhile by myself. I've been supported and assisted by many unselfish, dedicated people, the most important of whom has been my wife Gail.

"Thirdly, there are thousands of people in Australia who work quietly and humbly and who are very dedicated, who don't get recognised."

He paid tribute to the Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd, for backing the cancer centre, which he believed was essential to meet the growing challenge of cancer among the ageing population.

He said he wanted to become a doctor because he was "an idealist … and it would allow me to use what few talents I had to the best advantage".

Though his physical condition had deteriorated in the final months of his life, he was grateful he could read, and be read to by his wife and children.

He said his work had prepared him for the disease and for death: "I think inevitably I'll die of this, and I'm not frightened of dying. I'm at peace with my situation, I'm not willing it to come quick but it will come soon enough."

Gail and his children were with him at the end.


Lifehouse at RPA
krazykitkat: (the end (Angel))
Such a great loss.

From SMH:

CHRISTOPHER O'BRIEN, the world-renowned cancer specialist who died from a brain tumour last night, acquired many honours during his career, including being made an officer in the Order of Australia, to be announced in the Queen's Birthday honours list on Monday.

But, in his final interview two days ago, Professor O'Brien said what mattered most to him was his standing in the eyes of his three adult children: "I just want my children to really know they knew their father well and they loved and admired him as a person. That's my only wish really."

Professor O'Brien, who was 57, led research into head and neck cancer in Australia and operated on hundreds of patients, including the Test cricketer Norman O'Neill and the Dragon lead singer Marc Hunter.

Diagnosed with a brain tumour in November 2006, he refused to bow to his grim prognosis. He had five major operations before succumbing to the disease in Royal Prince Alfred Hospital.

The Herald visited the doctor at his Hunters Hill home on Wednesday to discuss his AO, awarded for his achievement in establishing the $150 million Lifehouse Centre at the hospital, the first purpose-built integrated cancer centre in Australia.

The man who played rugby for Sydney University and was well-known to television audiences as a vigorous and charismatic surgeon on the reality show RPA, sat hunched in an armchair, surrounded by books, his dog asleep at his feet.

Six weeks ago he had become paralysed on his left side, yet he retained the tenacity of mind that powered his stellar career.

He seemed keen to write his own legacy. Before the first question, he stated there were three things he wanted to get across: "The first is that I'm honoured to be recognised. Second is that, in my 30 years as a doctor and more than 20 years working as a specialist cancer surgeon, I really haven't achieved anything that was worthwhile by myself. I've been supported and assisted by many unselfish, dedicated people, the most important of whom has been my wife Gail.

"Thirdly, there are thousands of people in Australia who work quietly and humbly and who are very dedicated, who don't get recognised."

He paid tribute to the Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd, for backing the cancer centre, which he believed was essential to meet the growing challenge of cancer among the ageing population.

He said he wanted to become a doctor because he was "an idealist … and it would allow me to use what few talents I had to the best advantage".

Though his physical condition had deteriorated in the final months of his life, he was grateful he could read, and be read to by his wife and children.

He said his work had prepared him for the disease and for death: "I think inevitably I'll die of this, and I'm not frightened of dying. I'm at peace with my situation, I'm not willing it to come quick but it will come soon enough."

Gail and his children were with him at the end.


Lifehouse at RPA
krazykitkat: (the end (Angel))
Very sad about the death of Bud Tingwell. It feels like we've lost part of the country.

It's also lovely to hear everyone talk about what a wonderful man he was, a true gentleman. It shone through in the characters he played.
krazykitkat: (the end (Angel))
Very sad about the death of Bud Tingwell. It feels like we've lost part of the country.

It's also lovely to hear everyone talk about what a wonderful man he was, a true gentleman. It shone through in the characters he played.
krazykitkat: (the end (Angel))
Andy Hallet (Lorne on Angel) has died at 33 from heart failure.

Hadn't realised he was so young in Angel, I loved his voice. So sad, he's younger than me.
krazykitkat: (the end (Angel))
Andy Hallet (Lorne on Angel) has died at 33 from heart failure.

Hadn't realised he was so young in Angel, I loved his voice. So sad, he's younger than me.
krazykitkat: (the end (Angel))
From SMH:

CHARLES KINGSFORD SMITH didn't quite approve of women flying. And most Australians - men and women - didn't expect women to fly.

Nonetheless, "Smithy" took Nancy Bird on as one of the first pupils at his new flying school at Mascot in 1933, when she was 17. She became the first woman pilot in Australia with a licence to carry passengers, repeatedly surprising people who, on watching a light aircraft land, saw a tiny woman - she needed two cushions to see out of the cockpit and reach the foot pedals - climb from the cockpit and remove her helmet.

Seventy-five years later, last year, Qantas named the airline's first A380 superjumbo after Nancy-Bird Walton; she had joined a test flight in 2007.

The pioneer aviator died yesterday in Mosman. She was 93.

The acting Prime Minister, Julia Gillard, said: "Ever since her first flight, she helped dispel the myth that flying is solely a man's domain. Along with Kingsford Smith, Bert Hinkler and Reverend John Flynn, Nancy-Bird's name is synonymous with Australia's aviation history. Her achievements on the ground and in the air have inspired generations of women to forge careers in the aviation industry and reach for the skies in all walks of life."

The chief executive of Qantas, Alan Joyce, said Nancy-Bird Walton had been a trailblazer for women pilots and an inspiration for the nation. "We are so proud that our first A380 is named after Nancy-Bird and will carry her name into the future.

"Nancy-Bird's boundless energy, her courage and her vision for the role of women in aviation represented the best of Australia."

The diminutive redhead, inspired by the Great England-Australia Air Race of 1919, would jump off fences as a child and pretend to be an aeroplane. By the age of 14 she had saved enough money for a joy flight in a Gypsy Moth.

Taught to fly by Kingsford Smith and to navigate by his co-pilot, P.G. Taylor, Nancy Bird, as she was before marrying Charles Walton, took less than seven weeks to obtain her pilot's licence, but had to wait until she was 19 to be allowed to carry passengers.

She offered joy rides at country fairs and race meetings before being hired by the Far West Children's Health Scheme to fly nurses to the bush and patients to hospitals. She carried out some of the first medical evacuations in regional NSW.

Paying tribute to her yesterday, the chief executive of the Royal Flying Doctor Service, Nigel Milan, said that one of the first air ambulance missions was to fly Jack Stanmore, a baby born prematurely in Ivanhoe and not expected to live, to safety.

Last April Mr Stanmore and his wife, Ellie, were reunited with his rescuer at her retirement home, where Mrs Bird Walton met his grandchildren, as part of the flying doctor's 80th anniversary celebrations.

She had added commercial work to her health and safety missions, flying out of Cunamulla, Queensland, and often using roadmaps because no aviation maps existed.

After World War II broke out, she recruited and trained women for the WAAF. Later she founded the Australian Women's Pilots' Association and published her autobiography, My God, It's A Woman!.

She was awarded an OBE in 1966 and made an officer in the Order of Australia in 1990. The National Trust named her a living treasure in 1997.

The NSW Government will hold a state funeral for Mrs Bird Walton.


More detail on her life
here.
krazykitkat: (the end (Angel))
From SMH:

CHARLES KINGSFORD SMITH didn't quite approve of women flying. And most Australians - men and women - didn't expect women to fly.

Nonetheless, "Smithy" took Nancy Bird on as one of the first pupils at his new flying school at Mascot in 1933, when she was 17. She became the first woman pilot in Australia with a licence to carry passengers, repeatedly surprising people who, on watching a light aircraft land, saw a tiny woman - she needed two cushions to see out of the cockpit and reach the foot pedals - climb from the cockpit and remove her helmet.

Seventy-five years later, last year, Qantas named the airline's first A380 superjumbo after Nancy-Bird Walton; she had joined a test flight in 2007.

The pioneer aviator died yesterday in Mosman. She was 93.

The acting Prime Minister, Julia Gillard, said: "Ever since her first flight, she helped dispel the myth that flying is solely a man's domain. Along with Kingsford Smith, Bert Hinkler and Reverend John Flynn, Nancy-Bird's name is synonymous with Australia's aviation history. Her achievements on the ground and in the air have inspired generations of women to forge careers in the aviation industry and reach for the skies in all walks of life."

The chief executive of Qantas, Alan Joyce, said Nancy-Bird Walton had been a trailblazer for women pilots and an inspiration for the nation. "We are so proud that our first A380 is named after Nancy-Bird and will carry her name into the future.

"Nancy-Bird's boundless energy, her courage and her vision for the role of women in aviation represented the best of Australia."

The diminutive redhead, inspired by the Great England-Australia Air Race of 1919, would jump off fences as a child and pretend to be an aeroplane. By the age of 14 she had saved enough money for a joy flight in a Gypsy Moth.

Taught to fly by Kingsford Smith and to navigate by his co-pilot, P.G. Taylor, Nancy Bird, as she was before marrying Charles Walton, took less than seven weeks to obtain her pilot's licence, but had to wait until she was 19 to be allowed to carry passengers.

She offered joy rides at country fairs and race meetings before being hired by the Far West Children's Health Scheme to fly nurses to the bush and patients to hospitals. She carried out some of the first medical evacuations in regional NSW.

Paying tribute to her yesterday, the chief executive of the Royal Flying Doctor Service, Nigel Milan, said that one of the first air ambulance missions was to fly Jack Stanmore, a baby born prematurely in Ivanhoe and not expected to live, to safety.

Last April Mr Stanmore and his wife, Ellie, were reunited with his rescuer at her retirement home, where Mrs Bird Walton met his grandchildren, as part of the flying doctor's 80th anniversary celebrations.

She had added commercial work to her health and safety missions, flying out of Cunamulla, Queensland, and often using roadmaps because no aviation maps existed.

After World War II broke out, she recruited and trained women for the WAAF. Later she founded the Australian Women's Pilots' Association and published her autobiography, My God, It's A Woman!.

She was awarded an OBE in 1966 and made an officer in the Order of Australia in 1990. The National Trust named her a living treasure in 1997.

The NSW Government will hold a state funeral for Mrs Bird Walton.


More detail on her life
here.
krazykitkat: (the end (Angel))
Was sad to hear last night about the death of John Inman. I did love Are you being served? growing up. Mr Humphries's love of measuring the inside leg, and Mrs Slocombe's pussy.

And this brought an added tear to my eye:
In December 2005 he and his partner of 35 years, Ron Lynch, took part in a civil partnership ceremony at London's Westminster Register Office.

I'm glad he lived long enough to be able to have his great love legally recognised.

And just reading a tribute by his co-star Wendy Richards:
The real Mr Grace, from Australia's Grace Brothers store, even gave John his own staff key!
krazykitkat: (the end (Angel))
Was sad to hear last night about the death of John Inman. I did love Are you being served? growing up. Mr Humphries's love of measuring the inside leg, and Mrs Slocombe's pussy.

And this brought an added tear to my eye:
In December 2005 he and his partner of 35 years, Ron Lynch, took part in a civil partnership ceremony at London's Westminster Register Office.

I'm glad he lived long enough to be able to have his great love legally recognised.

And just reading a tribute by his co-star Wendy Richards:
The real Mr Grace, from Australia's Grace Brothers store, even gave John his own staff key!
krazykitkat: (oh my (Giles))
Billy Thorpe's death was a bit of a shock. Same age as my dad. While Most People I Know (Think That I'm Crazy) is probably the one that gets stuck in your head, I have a soft spot for his cover of Somewhere over the rainbow.

*

Danny bird had a sore eye this morning, kept it closed. Took him out to have a look at it, dripped some water into it just in case there was something caught, he really appreciated that. He's better tonight, but I think it's still bothering him. He might have scratched it.

If it continues I'll need to get him an eye patch and a pirate.
krazykitkat: (oh my (Giles))
Billy Thorpe's death was a bit of a shock. Same age as my dad. While Most People I Know (Think That I'm Crazy) is probably the one that gets stuck in your head, I have a soft spot for his cover of Somewhere over the rainbow.

*

Danny bird had a sore eye this morning, kept it closed. Took him out to have a look at it, dripped some water into it just in case there was something caught, he really appreciated that. He's better tonight, but I think it's still bothering him. He might have scratched it.

If it continues I'll need to get him an eye patch and a pirate.
krazykitkat: (precious (Firefly))
From smh:

She was the sweetheart who won not only the hearts of television viewers, but also of Australia's favourite television son.

A talented actor in her own right, Belinda Emmett, who died today after a long battle with cancer, shared a love with host Rove McManus that most people would only ever dream of.

Emmett, 32, passed away at Sydney's St Vincent's Hospital. ...

In May 1998, while she was filming the show, the actress revealed that she had been diagnosed with breast cancer.

She was just 24 years of age. ...

But in October 2001, three years after successfully fighting off the disease, she received the devastating news that she had secondary bone cancer.

She was also told by a Sydney oncologist that the cancer, discovered after scans of her back, would ultimately claim her life.



I've shed a few tears. I don't think I've ever even seen her act, but she was the same age as me and it was such a wake up call for many on breast cancer. The couple of times she's appeared in public in the last few years I'd wondered how she was doing, and unfortunately it wasn't a real shock to hear the news this morning. It was always a matter of when. I'm glad they were able to keep it out of the media.

And as much as I can't stand Rove in his professional role, I have much admiration and respect for him as a human being.
krazykitkat: (precious (Firefly))
From smh:

She was the sweetheart who won not only the hearts of television viewers, but also of Australia's favourite television son.

A talented actor in her own right, Belinda Emmett, who died today after a long battle with cancer, shared a love with host Rove McManus that most people would only ever dream of.

Emmett, 32, passed away at Sydney's St Vincent's Hospital. ...

In May 1998, while she was filming the show, the actress revealed that she had been diagnosed with breast cancer.

She was just 24 years of age. ...

But in October 2001, three years after successfully fighting off the disease, she received the devastating news that she had secondary bone cancer.

She was also told by a Sydney oncologist that the cancer, discovered after scans of her back, would ultimately claim her life.



I've shed a few tears. I don't think I've ever even seen her act, but she was the same age as me and it was such a wake up call for many on breast cancer. The couple of times she's appeared in public in the last few years I'd wondered how she was doing, and unfortunately it wasn't a real shock to hear the news this morning. It was always a matter of when. I'm glad they were able to keep it out of the media.

And as much as I can't stand Rove in his professional role, I have much admiration and respect for him as a human being.
krazykitkat: (oh my (Giles))
I got teary over Peter Brock. I grew up with dad watching motor racing, and he was Peter Perfect. I hope the Bridgestone gecko pays a tribute.

Managed to go 4 years without any dickheads commenting anonymously (I'm just not interesting enough). Not sure whether to screen or disallow anonymous...

And this makes me sadder:

His death on Monday aged 44 raises questions over the future of his enterprises. John Stainton, who produces and directs his TV and film work, says the show will go on. "He's an icon and that will be a big void now that someone will have to fill," he said yesterday.

That someone would be Irwin's eight-year-old daughter, Bindi. Stainton has already made seven of a planned 26 episodes of a documentary featuring her and said she was likely to star in her first movie by the end of next year.

"She will probably in the next four or five years eclipse the fame of her father," he said. "I said that to him only a few weeks ago and he said, 'That would be my only wish' and I have no doubt about it, she is so talented. I would imagine she's going to be as big as the Olsen twins."
krazykitkat: (oh my (Giles))
I got teary over Peter Brock. I grew up with dad watching motor racing, and he was Peter Perfect. I hope the Bridgestone gecko pays a tribute.

Managed to go 4 years without any dickheads commenting anonymously (I'm just not interesting enough). Not sure whether to screen or disallow anonymous...

And this makes me sadder:

His death on Monday aged 44 raises questions over the future of his enterprises. John Stainton, who produces and directs his TV and film work, says the show will go on. "He's an icon and that will be a big void now that someone will have to fill," he said yesterday.

That someone would be Irwin's eight-year-old daughter, Bindi. Stainton has already made seven of a planned 26 episodes of a documentary featuring her and said she was likely to star in her first movie by the end of next year.

"She will probably in the next four or five years eclipse the fame of her father," he said. "I said that to him only a few weeks ago and he said, 'That would be my only wish' and I have no doubt about it, she is so talented. I would imagine she's going to be as big as the Olsen twins."
krazykitkat: (tears (Ever After))
From [livejournal.com profile] familyarchives:

J. Madison Wright (True on Earth 2) dies at age 21, just 2 weeks after she married :(

When I got my E2 dvds I'd been wondering how she was doing, as I remembered about the heart transplant. So very sad. I understand Clancy Brown was still in touch with her (and did fundraising for her foundation). ETA: Clancy has left a message in the condolence book at the article.
krazykitkat: (tears (Ever After))
From [livejournal.com profile] familyarchives:

J. Madison Wright (True on Earth 2) dies at age 21, just 2 weeks after she married :(

When I got my E2 dvds I'd been wondering how she was doing, as I remembered about the heart transplant. So very sad. I understand Clancy Brown was still in touch with her (and did fundraising for her foundation). ETA: Clancy has left a message in the condolence book at the article.

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