krazykitkat: (smart (CJ))
Brilliant speech by ex Prime Minister Julia Gillard. Particularly from ~7min 20s. She is a huge loss and history will treat her much more kindly.

"I want to just say a few remarks about being the first woman to serve in this position.

"There's been a lot of analysis about the so-called gender wars . . . me playing the so-called gender card because heavens knows no-one noticed I was a woman until I raised it, but against that background, I do want to say about all of these issues, the reaction to being the first female Prime Minister does not explain everything about my Prime Ministership, nor does it explain nothing about my Prime Ministership.

"I've been a little bit bemused by those colleagues in the newspaper who have admitted that I have suffered more pressure as a result of my gender than other Prime Ministers in the past but then concluded that it had zero effect on my political position or the political position of the Labor Party.

"It doesn't explain everything . . . it explains some things.

"And it is for the nation to think in a sophisticated way about those shades of grey. What I am absolutely confident of is it will be easier for the next woman and the woman after that and the woman after that - and I'm proud of that."

video )

And fabulous balanced article here.

Julia Gillard is incredibly brave, astoundingly resilient, one of the toughest people we have seen in The Lodge. Through all the difficulties of her prime ministership she was stoic, dignified, composed, resilient. She departed in that style on Wednesday night. Shoulders back. Head high. In the circumstances - the provocation, the consistent undermining by colleagues, the terrible erosion of her authority executed by her enemies within Labor, Kevin Rudd's slow terrible revenge - she exited with class.

There was no self pity. She was confident it would be easier for the next woman, and the one after that. She had done her best. She had achieved difficult things in tough times. She had blazed a trail.
krazykitkat: (bugger)
I wanted to buy some official campaign things from the Obama store, but they don't ship internationally :( Neither do democraticstuff.com.
krazykitkat: (bugger)
I wanted to buy some official campaign things from the Obama store, but they don't ship internationally :( Neither do democraticstuff.com.

Obama!

Nov. 6th, 2008 01:04 am
krazykitkat: (smart (CJ))
I feel kind of silly for being so excited and proud.

I'm sitting here dubbing news bulletins (bugger, I haven't got Obama's speech). I watched 3 hours of election coverage before I went to work this morning, switching between 9 (ABC) and 7 (CNN and NBC). Even had dad dig out the aerial and extension leads so I could watch the tv in the loo!

Only radio when I went to work and couldn't find good coverage, but listened to the speeches. I thought McCain was very gracious. And Obama...I got teary while trying to work at my computer. And they kept repeating this section, and it broke me every time:

This election had many firsts and many stories that will be told for generations. But one that's on my mind tonight is about a woman who cast her ballot in Atlanta. She's a lot like the millions of others who stood in line to make their voice heard in this election except for one thing: Ann Nixon Cooper is 106 years old.

She was born just a generation past slavery; a time when there were no cars on the road or planes in the sky; when someone like her couldn't vote for two reasons: because she was a woman and because of the color of her skin.

And tonight, I think about all that she's seen throughout her century in America - the heartache and the hope; the struggle and the progress; the times we were told that we can't, and the people who pressed on with that American creed: Yes we can.

At a time when women's voices were silenced and their hopes dismissed, she lived to see them stand up and speak out and reach for the ballot. Yes we can.

When there was despair in the dust bowl and depression across the land, she saw a nation conquer fear itself with a New Deal, new jobs and a new sense of common purpose. Yes we can.

When the bombs fell on our harbor and tyranny threatened the world, she was there to witness a generation rise to greatness, and a democracy was saved. Yes we can.

She was there for the buses in Montgomery, the hoses in Birmingham, a bridge in Selma, and a preacher from Atlanta who told a people that "We Shall Overcome." Yes we can.

A man touched down on the moon, a wall came down in Berlin, a world was connected by our own science and imagination. And this year, in this election, she touched her finger to a screen and cast her vote, because, after 106 years in America, through the best of times and the darkest of hours, she knows how America can change. Yes we can.

America, we have come so far. We have seen so much. But there is so much more to do. So tonight, let us ask ourselves: If our children should live to see the next century; if my daughters should be so lucky to live as long as Ann Nixon Cooper, what change will they see? What progress will we have made?



A wonderful day.

Obama!

Nov. 6th, 2008 01:04 am
krazykitkat: (smart (CJ))
I feel kind of silly for being so excited and proud.

I'm sitting here dubbing news bulletins (bugger, I haven't got Obama's speech). I watched 3 hours of election coverage before I went to work this morning, switching between 9 (ABC) and 7 (CNN and NBC). Even had dad dig out the aerial and extension leads so I could watch the tv in the loo!

Only radio when I went to work and couldn't find good coverage, but listened to the speeches. I thought McCain was very gracious. And Obama...I got teary while trying to work at my computer. And they kept repeating this section, and it broke me every time:

This election had many firsts and many stories that will be told for generations. But one that's on my mind tonight is about a woman who cast her ballot in Atlanta. She's a lot like the millions of others who stood in line to make their voice heard in this election except for one thing: Ann Nixon Cooper is 106 years old.

She was born just a generation past slavery; a time when there were no cars on the road or planes in the sky; when someone like her couldn't vote for two reasons: because she was a woman and because of the color of her skin.

And tonight, I think about all that she's seen throughout her century in America - the heartache and the hope; the struggle and the progress; the times we were told that we can't, and the people who pressed on with that American creed: Yes we can.

At a time when women's voices were silenced and their hopes dismissed, she lived to see them stand up and speak out and reach for the ballot. Yes we can.

When there was despair in the dust bowl and depression across the land, she saw a nation conquer fear itself with a New Deal, new jobs and a new sense of common purpose. Yes we can.

When the bombs fell on our harbor and tyranny threatened the world, she was there to witness a generation rise to greatness, and a democracy was saved. Yes we can.

She was there for the buses in Montgomery, the hoses in Birmingham, a bridge in Selma, and a preacher from Atlanta who told a people that "We Shall Overcome." Yes we can.

A man touched down on the moon, a wall came down in Berlin, a world was connected by our own science and imagination. And this year, in this election, she touched her finger to a screen and cast her vote, because, after 106 years in America, through the best of times and the darkest of hours, she knows how America can change. Yes we can.

America, we have come so far. We have seen so much. But there is so much more to do. So tonight, let us ask ourselves: If our children should live to see the next century; if my daughters should be so lucky to live as long as Ann Nixon Cooper, what change will they see? What progress will we have made?



A wonderful day.
krazykitkat: (weather)
Emergency drill at work today. On a horrible wet and windy day.

Luckily it wasn't raining much when we were outside, but it was cold and awful. And I didn't take my cardigan, because I thought they surely wouldn't be keeping us out in that, so I was in short sleeves. But even the cardigan wouldn't have helped my poor toes and fingers (and there's a healing chilblain on my finger, essentially a pit - healing really really hurts, especially since it's almost on a joint so keeps getting stretched). The lovely [livejournal.com profile] vanwasigma was my friend and windbreak.

*

What a day in NSW politics.

Glad to see the back end of Costa (pity he didn't blow himself up) and Iemma. Barry O'Farrell was looking attractive.

Hope Rees can do some good, though I'm not holding my breath. Interesting for the Labor Left, having control for the first time.
krazykitkat: (weather)
Emergency drill at work today. On a horrible wet and windy day.

Luckily it wasn't raining much when we were outside, but it was cold and awful. And I didn't take my cardigan, because I thought they surely wouldn't be keeping us out in that, so I was in short sleeves. But even the cardigan wouldn't have helped my poor toes and fingers (and there's a healing chilblain on my finger, essentially a pit - healing really really hurts, especially since it's almost on a joint so keeps getting stretched). The lovely [livejournal.com profile] vanwasigma was my friend and windbreak.

*

What a day in NSW politics.

Glad to see the back end of Costa (pity he didn't blow himself up) and Iemma. Barry O'Farrell was looking attractive.

Hope Rees can do some good, though I'm not holding my breath. Interesting for the Labor Left, having control for the first time.

deja vu

Feb. 16th, 2007 01:47 am
krazykitkat: (wtf (Casey - SVU))
From SMH:

Australia's pandering to the United States takes many forms, including large-scale military misadventures, submissive "cultural" surrender, and protecting to the last dime the sanctity of American global profits.

The US has got one of ours banged up at Guantanamo Bay and another in Parklea prison.

Hew Griffiths has been in prison here for nearly three years for allegedly breaching US copyright law. He has been charged by a grand jury in the US, but the offences alleged against him have never been tested, and the Australian Government has refused to resist an American demand to "surrender" him to face trial before the US District Court in Virginia.

There is no guarantee that the time he has served in prison will be credited against any US sentence, which could be for as long as 10 years.

It all sounds horribly familiar.

...

What is particularly fascinating is that it is possible for Griffiths to be charged with these offences under the Australian Copyright Act. The downloading took place in Australia, and Drink or Die was not an American group - it originated in Finland where it was known as LA, or Lunatic Asylum, with members around the world.

Griffiths has instructed his solicitors that he would plead guilty to offences under our Copyright Act. He has probably already spent more time in prison than any person convicted of a copyright offence in Australia.

After a series of raids by the US Customs Service, about 60 people were arrested in a variety of countries, including 45 in the US and eight in Britain.

All the British were charged under British laws and the US did not push for extradition. Griffiths is the only person, and the only Australian, in the group that the US is pressing to extradite.

It seems the Australian Attorney-General, Philip Ruddock, and his department are only too eager to co-operate. ...

deja vu

Feb. 16th, 2007 01:47 am
krazykitkat: (wtf (Casey - SVU))
From SMH:

Australia's pandering to the United States takes many forms, including large-scale military misadventures, submissive "cultural" surrender, and protecting to the last dime the sanctity of American global profits.

The US has got one of ours banged up at Guantanamo Bay and another in Parklea prison.

Hew Griffiths has been in prison here for nearly three years for allegedly breaching US copyright law. He has been charged by a grand jury in the US, but the offences alleged against him have never been tested, and the Australian Government has refused to resist an American demand to "surrender" him to face trial before the US District Court in Virginia.

There is no guarantee that the time he has served in prison will be credited against any US sentence, which could be for as long as 10 years.

It all sounds horribly familiar.

...

What is particularly fascinating is that it is possible for Griffiths to be charged with these offences under the Australian Copyright Act. The downloading took place in Australia, and Drink or Die was not an American group - it originated in Finland where it was known as LA, or Lunatic Asylum, with members around the world.

Griffiths has instructed his solicitors that he would plead guilty to offences under our Copyright Act. He has probably already spent more time in prison than any person convicted of a copyright offence in Australia.

After a series of raids by the US Customs Service, about 60 people were arrested in a variety of countries, including 45 in the US and eight in Britain.

All the British were charged under British laws and the US did not push for extradition. Griffiths is the only person, and the only Australian, in the group that the US is pressing to extradite.

It seems the Australian Attorney-General, Philip Ruddock, and his department are only too eager to co-operate. ...
krazykitkat: (deep thoughts (Toby))
Good article on the current flag arguments.

his great achievement transformed into a piece of social graffiti, a toy, a trend, a product, marketed like a Steve Irwin lunchbox, but so much more than that. A symbol. Yes, but of what? It would be simpler to divine the meaning of Steve Irwin. The flag furrows the brow. Love of nation, or rejection of others? Inclusion or exclusion? Patriotism, or its ugly offspring, strident nationalism?

Personally the flag does nothing for me (and my ancestry is mostly English convicts - I feel no loyalty to the Union Jack, my ancestors were essentially unwanted), and the flag worship that's evolved in the last few years makes me uneasy.
krazykitkat: (deep thoughts (Toby))
Good article on the current flag arguments.

his great achievement transformed into a piece of social graffiti, a toy, a trend, a product, marketed like a Steve Irwin lunchbox, but so much more than that. A symbol. Yes, but of what? It would be simpler to divine the meaning of Steve Irwin. The flag furrows the brow. Love of nation, or rejection of others? Inclusion or exclusion? Patriotism, or its ugly offspring, strident nationalism?

Personally the flag does nothing for me (and my ancestry is mostly English convicts - I feel no loyalty to the Union Jack, my ancestors were essentially unwanted), and the flag worship that's evolved in the last few years makes me uneasy.
krazykitkat: (dream (Susan - B5))
Note: don't ask questions during US holidays...

Reasking: recommendation for what Vienna Teng cd to buy first (I have Warm Strangers mp3ified)?

*

I only just survived work. When I got up this morning I was so tired I felt like crying. And had to get up and walk around a few times at work to keep myself awake.

But another fortnight/pay period I've done my full hours. That's a month, four weeks in a row, of doing my full hours. I am superwoman :)

Thursday was funny. I don't normally work it, and I walked in around my old side and K looked at me strangely and said, "What are you doing here?" :)

*

I am just a tad excited about finding Barry Jones' autobiography. And annoyed I didn't know till I just saw it in the ABC cattledog. Costs a pretty penny though. A few years back I considered writing to Barry Jones and asking him to write his autobiography...or if he didn't want to do it, let me! Yes, I was younger and stupider...but I so wanted to hear his story.

And everybody reading this either has no idea who I'm talking about or can't stand him.

*

And I think my dvd player just exploded. There were these popping sounds coming from the direction of the tv/dvd/vcrs, I looked and couldn't find anything. More popping sounds. The tv turned on okay, the vcrs played okay, the dvd player turned on okay...but it smells. I've unplugged everything until dad can look at them in the morning. Damn dvd player, it's only just over a year old and has barely been used. I had to buy it to replace the previous one in which the power supply carked it. I only paid $60 for it, but still.
krazykitkat: (dream (Susan - B5))
Note: don't ask questions during US holidays...

Reasking: recommendation for what Vienna Teng cd to buy first (I have Warm Strangers mp3ified)?

*

I only just survived work. When I got up this morning I was so tired I felt like crying. And had to get up and walk around a few times at work to keep myself awake.

But another fortnight/pay period I've done my full hours. That's a month, four weeks in a row, of doing my full hours. I am superwoman :)

Thursday was funny. I don't normally work it, and I walked in around my old side and K looked at me strangely and said, "What are you doing here?" :)

*

I am just a tad excited about finding Barry Jones' autobiography. And annoyed I didn't know till I just saw it in the ABC cattledog. Costs a pretty penny though. A few years back I considered writing to Barry Jones and asking him to write his autobiography...or if he didn't want to do it, let me! Yes, I was younger and stupider...but I so wanted to hear his story.

And everybody reading this either has no idea who I'm talking about or can't stand him.

*

And I think my dvd player just exploded. There were these popping sounds coming from the direction of the tv/dvd/vcrs, I looked and couldn't find anything. More popping sounds. The tv turned on okay, the vcrs played okay, the dvd player turned on okay...but it smells. I've unplugged everything until dad can look at them in the morning. Damn dvd player, it's only just over a year old and has barely been used. I had to buy it to replace the previous one in which the power supply carked it. I only paid $60 for it, but still.
krazykitkat: (something more (Miss Parker))
Thank you to everyone who helped explain the mid-term elections and term lengths to me. I have knowledge! Still weirded out by the two year Congress terms. While the initial reasons for it do sound perfectly reasonable, it seems like a bit of a waste of money, time and effort now.

Tax cheque arrived today, I calculated it to the cent. It's all going to my parents.

A cup of coffee at lunch makes me jittery for the rest of the afternoon. For breakfast I have a cup of instant coffee (milk-based). Doesn't do anything for me, doesn't even really wake me up. Had a cup of the same for lunch - because I've had the jitters a couple of times I made sure it was a flat teaspoon of the coffee. Jittery again this arvo. Yet I can drink coke no problems. It's a pain, every so often I like a cup of coffee for lunch. I must have very low tolerance levels.

My very first nephew/niece is due in 12 days. And I'll be meeting my honourary nephew for the first time soon, my best friend and hubby and bubby are coming out for Christmas (they live in Zurich). He'll be 5 months old, becoming his own little person.

I really have nothing worthwhile to say.
krazykitkat: (something more (Miss Parker))
Thank you to everyone who helped explain the mid-term elections and term lengths to me. I have knowledge! Still weirded out by the two year Congress terms. While the initial reasons for it do sound perfectly reasonable, it seems like a bit of a waste of money, time and effort now.

Tax cheque arrived today, I calculated it to the cent. It's all going to my parents.

A cup of coffee at lunch makes me jittery for the rest of the afternoon. For breakfast I have a cup of instant coffee (milk-based). Doesn't do anything for me, doesn't even really wake me up. Had a cup of the same for lunch - because I've had the jitters a couple of times I made sure it was a flat teaspoon of the coffee. Jittery again this arvo. Yet I can drink coke no problems. It's a pain, every so often I like a cup of coffee for lunch. I must have very low tolerance levels.

My very first nephew/niece is due in 12 days. And I'll be meeting my honourary nephew for the first time soon, my best friend and hubby and bubby are coming out for Christmas (they live in Zurich). He'll be 5 months old, becoming his own little person.

I really have nothing worthwhile to say.
krazykitkat: (smart (CJ))
I'm not sure if they ever fully explained the midterms on tWW.

Now, I understand that all the House of Reps and about a third of the Senate were up for election? How long are the terms? What happens in 2008? Does the House of Reps go up for election again? Another part of the Senate?

And, [livejournal.com profile] sangerin, have you heard about the NSW chapter of Democrats Abroad Australia?

And YAY for South Dakota voting down the abortion ban! Though it's still scary that 45% voted for it.

And on the local front, argh about the non-listing of the cervical cancer vaccine on the PBS. Not that it would give it to me free...they don't seem to think that women over 26 might be virgins. And actually I'm confused as to whether I'll even be allowed to have it (though the way I'm going I won't ever actually need it), they keep saying 12-26. I might ring MBF tomorrow and see whether maybe part of the cost may be covered by them, they do cover non-PBS medications. Because $460 is nearly 2 weeks wages.

But congrats to the Senate on passing the stem cell bill. Interesting that in such a narrow vote, 34-32, apparently 18 of the 21 women voted yes (I think that was the number I heard on the news this morning).
krazykitkat: (smart (CJ))
I'm not sure if they ever fully explained the midterms on tWW.

Now, I understand that all the House of Reps and about a third of the Senate were up for election? How long are the terms? What happens in 2008? Does the House of Reps go up for election again? Another part of the Senate?

And, [livejournal.com profile] sangerin, have you heard about the NSW chapter of Democrats Abroad Australia?

And YAY for South Dakota voting down the abortion ban! Though it's still scary that 45% voted for it.

And on the local front, argh about the non-listing of the cervical cancer vaccine on the PBS. Not that it would give it to me free...they don't seem to think that women over 26 might be virgins. And actually I'm confused as to whether I'll even be allowed to have it (though the way I'm going I won't ever actually need it), they keep saying 12-26. I might ring MBF tomorrow and see whether maybe part of the cost may be covered by them, they do cover non-PBS medications. Because $460 is nearly 2 weeks wages.

But congrats to the Senate on passing the stem cell bill. Interesting that in such a narrow vote, 34-32, apparently 18 of the 21 women voted yes (I think that was the number I heard on the news this morning).
krazykitkat: (smart (CJ))
First we lose Natasha Stott Despoja.

And now one of the shining lights of journalism:

SHE has been described as dangerous, but only the powerful needed to fear her. Now they can relax: Maxine McKew, TV's most agile, smart and charming interrogator, is leaving broadcasting, probably for good.
krazykitkat: (smart (CJ))
First we lose Natasha Stott Despoja.

And now one of the shining lights of journalism:

SHE has been described as dangerous, but only the powerful needed to fear her. Now they can relax: Maxine McKew, TV's most agile, smart and charming interrogator, is leaving broadcasting, probably for good.
krazykitkat: (oh my (Giles))
Very happy to say that The Path to 9/11 rated poorly here in Oz.

Sunday night - 4th (beaten by even ABC (our public tv network))

Description Network Sydney Melbourne Brisbane Adelaide Perth
3 AUSTRALIAN IDOL Ten 1,537,000 402,000 505,000 235,000 194,000 199,000
7 50 YEARS, 50 STARS Nine 1,311,000 385,000 433,000 187,000 160,000 145,000
11 LAW & ORDER: CRIMINAL INTENT Ten 1,085,000 272,000 366,000 176,000 135,000 137,000
15 ELIZABETH I ABC 850,000 263,000 249,000 121,000 98,000 119,000
18 THE PATH TO 9/11 PART 1 Seven 709,000 207,000 240,000 109,000 59,000 94,000

L&O:CI started around 10pm, after Idol, so there seemed to be more people willing to start watching a show at that time then started watching Path at 8.30pm.


Monday night - scraped into third,beating Two Twisted by about 30,000
The Path to 9/11 got just 677,000, dropping a million viewers from its lead-in of Grey's Anatomy. Andrew Denton's interview with Al Gore on ABC got 971,000, a repeat of SVU got just over a million.

July 2015

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